Southern California Desert Video Astronomers

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Our Mission.............................
" To share our abilities with astronomy in order to preserve dark starry night skies and a vibrant healthy environment in the California Desert and everywhere else on our Planet for future generations! "

SCDVA, moving the line for dark skies and environmental awareness.

 
    

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The World's First & Only Live Astronomy Theater.

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WELCOME

FRIENDS AROUND THE WORLD!
Let's explore our wonderful Universe together!

 
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WHAT'S HAPPENING

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Being held at the
Joshua Tree Lake RV & Campground


For More Information go to https://vacationraces.com/half-marathons/joshua-tree/





Clear Sky Chart for The Joshua Tree Astronomy Arts Theater  
 

   

  

Moon Phases for October 2019




January moon, February moon, March moon, April moon, May moon, June moon, July moon, August moon, September moon, October moon, November moon, December Moon

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SCDVA, Official IDA Chapter Serving The High Desert Region
of
San Bernardino County
 
 

      

IDA International Dark Sky Association


"Ask not what dark skies can do for you, rather,
Ask what you can do for dark skies."

                                                                                Inspired by a quote from JFK



 

 

Click the above image to see amazing live views of our earth
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Book Your Fun Events Now Under the Beautiful Joshua Tree Night Skies
JTAATinfo@gmail.com


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For our next Star Party or Event
Why Not Make it an All Nighter Under the Starry Nights of the Joshua Tree Desert Skies.

 Make your camping reservations early
         At the Joshua Tree Lake RV & Campground
     
       


Questions?

Contact us at:
scdvainfo@gmail.com



                          
                       

 

OCTOBER SKIES



October 5th - International Observe the Moon Night



According to NASA, "The event is timed to coincide with the first quarter moon. This allows for some great observing along the lunar terminator — the line that divides the dayside from the nightside. With even a small pair of binoculars, you can see some great details as features like mountains and craters pop up into the light. Learn more and look for events in your area at moon.nasa.gov/observe."  

The Moon will be in it's first quarter phase rising at 11:21am Zenith at 4:14 pm and sets at 9:07 pm.
If you would like more information on how to participate go to 
EarthSky Observe the Moon https://earthsky.org/human-world/international-observe-the-moon-night-october-5

  
October 8th - The Annual Draconid Meteor Shower. 


Also know as the Giacobinids, will peak and is best viewed in the early evening at nightfall. This is usually a moderate meteor shower originating near the head of the constellation Draco the Dragon.  
These meteors are created by dust left behind by the periodic comet Giacobini - Zinner. 
Try the nights of October 7 and 9, too but the bright waxing gibbous moon will interfere somewhat on this year’s observing.



First-quarter Moon ( at 08:10 p.m. PDT). Bright in the 
southern sky as the stars come out. Jupiter is shining a few degrees to the left of the Moon a dimmer orange Antares (heart of the Scorpion) twinkling farther below it.

October 13th - Full Hunter's Moon

According to the Farmers Almanac, this full Moon is also referred to as the "Full Hunter’s Moon, Blood Moon, or Sanguine Moon. Many moons ago, Native Americans named this bright moon for obvious reasons. The leaves are falling from trees, the deer are fattened, and it’s time to begin storing up meat for the long winter ahead. Because the fields were traditionally reaped in late September or early October, hunters could easily see fox and other animals that come out to glean from the fallen grains. Probably because of the threat of winter looming close, the Hunter’s Moon is generally accorded with special honor, historically serving as an important feast day in both Western Europe and among many Native American tribes."   Corn, pumpkins, squash, beans, and wild rice the chief Indian staples are now ready for gathering.

  
                                                    (Photo Credit: NASA Goddard)


October 21 & 22 The Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks

Somtimes producing bright fireballs it is best viewed in the very late evening of the 21st into the early morning hours before sunrise of the 21st & 22nd. We're in luck this year as there will be no Moon to interfere with viewing.
This shower is the cosmic dust from the most famous comet, Halley’s comet. 
The meteors appear to come from a point near the Orion-Gemini border in Orion’s upraised club, hence the name. This year should be very favorable for viewing due to the moon being just past new phase so skies will be dark. Best viewed overhead from 1 to 2 a.m. local  time until dawn. Hopefully you may see 20-25 meteors per hour!




                                                       


October 31st


               





   




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Joshua Tree Astronomy Arts Theater
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Check out the  
Joshua Tree Astronomy Arts Theater

 

Facebook site
for further & future details
on
Upcoming Events

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Check out the JTAAT Movie by Leonard Holmberg,

Showing some of the Happenings and Fun

Click below to take a journey.


Take a trip to our Astronomy Theater, live images captured and displayed on our giant screen. JTAAT a magical place for Concerts, Star Parties, Art Exhibits​, Weddings and Special Events. Special thanks to SCDVA.org and Nasa.


   

  


                       
For online priceing & info go to

www.jtlake.com


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Please Help Support our efforts. To contribute, click the link below.

Or mail your Contributions to

JTAAT
P.O. Box 425
Joshua Tree Ca. 92252

Thank you for your support


Note:  non tax deductible





Last updated October 27, 2019